Social conflict in the context of development of new mining in Zambia 2014

Social conflict in the context of development of new mining in Zambia 2014

Zambia’s mining sector currently accounts for over 80% of the country’s total export earnings, contributes about 11 per cent to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and it has created over 65,000 jobs in the fourth largest copper producing country in the world. It is worth noting that the improvement in the sector’s performance is highly attributed to a favourable investment climate and competitive global metal prices, among other factors. This is evidenced by the expansion of the industry both in terms of quantity and type of minerals mined in the country. This article reports on new direct foreign investments, the impacts of new mining concessions on local livelihoods and the conflicts they have triggered. The authors review evidence regarding debates on the resource curse and the possibility of an extraction-led pathway to development and its consequent social conflicts. Further, the authors describe different types of resentments and social mobilization that have greeted mineral expansion at two mining concessions within the country, and consider how far these conflicts have changed the relationships between mining firms and local communities. The conclusions in this paper address how far economic benefit-based social conflicts can be managed in mining communities so that the very investment that was meant to improve the livelihoods of the local people in those communities is not threatened.

Social cconflict in the context of development of new mining in Zambia 2014- Robby Kapesa, Jacob Mwitwa and D.C. Chikumbi

 

 

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